Miss pierrette distributes vitamin a at platon primary 

1.5 Years of Public Health Outreach in Côtes de Fer

 

  Miss Pierrette distributes Vitamin A at Platon PrimaryMiss Pierrette distributes Vitamin A at Platon Primary Pre-School student at Pereno takes Vitamin A booster
Pre-School student at Pereno takes Vitamin A booster

January 29, 2011

In 2009, Hope for Haiti began a partnership with California based non-profit, Vitamin Angels, to supply micronutrients to our network of supported schools and clinics in southern Haiti.

One of our initial visits took place at Platon Primary School in the seaside mountains of Côtes de Fer, where Hope for Haiti helps support Teacher Salaries. Accessible only on foot, the school’s 124 students rarely set foot in a clinic.

Over the last year and half, however, the students of Platon have received visits from Hope for Haiti’s Public Health nurses and field staff, who conduct health education lessons, distribute Vitamin A boosters and de-worming medication, and stock the school with supplies of multivitamins.

This past week marked our third visit to Platon. Trekking to seven schools in five days, we conducted lessons on the link between hygiene and cholera and distributed quality medications. In all, we reached a total of 1,156 students in Kindergarten through 6th grade. The accompanying photos capture a small part of the trip and the preventive healthcare activities it accomplished. Thank you Vitamin Angels for your partnership and for helping to make this possible!

Miss Rachel at St. Rose of Gris Gris
Miss Rachel at St. Rose of Gris Gris
Pereno Primary School, one of our seven stops
Pereno Primary School, one of our seven stops
Ray of hope 

Where there is no Doctor

Ray of Hope
Ray of Hope
Pediatric cholera ward
Pediatric cholera ward

January 21, 2011

In two rural clinics where Hope for Haiti supports schools and nutrition facilities, the local populations have been living with no doctor for months on end. Communities in the mountains of Gris Gris (Sud-Est Department) and Baradères (Nippes Department) are hours on foot from healthcare facilities and even further from a full-fledged hospital. While the local clinics do their part to address routine health issues and conduct outreach in isolated areas, the absence of advanced healthcare professionals leaves many cases, many patients, and many lives to fall through the cracks.

CTC with MSF present
CTC with MSF present

Hope for Haiti’s first effort was to send a young and energetic Haitian, Dr. Gracia Schiler, to the community of Baradères, where he could help the Little Sisters of St. Therese and the local nurses tackle the declining health of the community. But in December, an outbreak of cholera seized Baradères and took immediate priority over the clinic’s operations. Dispatching to his post early and working through the entire holiday season, Dr. Gracia helped set up the Cholera Treatment Center (CTC) in collaboration with extremely dedicated volunteers from Doctors Without Borders (MSF).

The tents are hot and wet; bleach tinges the nose and mixes into mud across the tarp-covered floor. But the clinical facilities are clean and the care is top-notch. Patients who come to the CTC are eventually leaving, alive. As the epidemic continues, Hope for Haiti’s approach will remain two-fold: we’ll support MSF and the local staff at the CTC while filling the clinic’s gap with a full-time physician. Where there was no doctor, now there is hope.

Inside the Cholera Tent
Inside the Cholera Tent
CTC in Baradères
CTC in Baradères
3 parents waiting
3 parents waiting
Accelien jean recovers at the infirmary st. etienne on january 12th 

Hope for Haiti Commemorates January 12th by Serving the Sick

Accelien Jean recovers at the Infirmary St. Etienne on January 12th
Accelien Jean recovers at the Infirmary St. Etienne on January 12th
Dr. Poussin follows the blood pressure of Liphane from the nursing home next door
Dr. Poussin follows the blood pressure of Liphane from the nursing home next door

January 15, 2011

Last week January 12th was upon us again, almost like the 11th or the 13th, except …different. The symbolic perspective of a year gone by prodded increased reflection, memory, and pain. And of course, heightened media coverage. The hype, the scrutiny – one year later and what have we done?

At the Hope for Haiti Infirmary, work continued as it does every day. The clinic opened at 8am, the chairs were brought from their storage spot to the patient waiting area, vital signs were taken and dossiers prepared. It was quieter than usual, fewer patients, less chatter, a bit more introspection than a regular workday. But our care of the sick in Les Cayes continued, uninterrupted.

The government had announced a holiday aimed at respect and remembrance. Sadly, the announcement came without enough time to really unite the populace around either sentiment. Some schools cancelled classes, some businesses were closed, but other schools stayed open and commemorated the day, both historic and tragic, with their students and teachers. Many Haitians continued their everyday lives just like on the 11th or the 13th. Business as usual, except more somber.

Dr. Steeve Victor and Nurse Fildor Dapheline dedicate half the day of remembrance to serving others
Dr. Steeve Victor and Nurse Fildor Dapheline dedicate half the day of remembrance to serving others

As a healthcare facility, the Hope for Haiti Infirmary stayed open for a half day to treat any urgent cases waiting outside the red gates. We wanted to recognize the needs of our Haitian staff by giving them time with their friends and families. We wanted to remember those who were lost, and respect the pain of those who lost them. But we also wanted to show resilience. So what better way to remember the victims than to continue serving the survivors? On January 12th, we could have taken a full day off. But instead, we welcomed the vulnerable and treated the sick.

For Macilia St. Juste, an 81-year-old woman and regular patient at the clinic for her high blood pressure and diabetes, the clinic being open meant her getting treated for the fainting spell she had experienced that morning. As a result of the political unrest surrounding the November 28th elections, her medications were running low. But on January 12th, she came to clinic with her grandson and restocked.

One of our new Community Health Workers came in with his aging father-in-law. At 67 years old and only 85 pounds, Accelien Jean was not doing well at all. His malnourished frame lay hooked up to an IV as our nurses gave him urgent medications. Had our clinic not been open, January 12th might have claimed yet another victim.

Even if these were the only two patients we saw that morning, it would have been worth it. But there were others, children included. And so our commemoration tactics of service and perseverance paid off. In remembering the past, let us work to improve the present. In honoring the dead, let us not forget the living.

There is much to be done.

Joanne kuehner, founder and president, and her granddaughter, tiffany kuehner, vice president, pray for all who have been affected by the january 12, 2010 earthquake, during a hope for haiti remembrance ceremony. 

HAITI EARTHQUAKE: ONE YEAR LATER A DAY OF REMEMBRANCE

 

January 12, 2011

Naples, Florida, January 12, 2011 – On Wednesday, January 12, 2011, Naples, Florida based 501(c)(3) charitable organization, Hope for Haiti, observed a “Day of Remembrance” with staff, volunteers and community members. After a challenging and emotional year, Hope for Haiti hosted a gathering to reflect and remember the lives that were lost, the hearts that were broken, the homes that were destroyed, and the 1.3 million families who are still homeless after the 7.0 earthquake devastated Haiti’s capital and surrounding areas on January 12, 2010.

Reverend Benjamin Casimir of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish in Immokalee and Roman Catholic Bishop Frank J. Dewane of the Diocese of Venice, lead Hope for Haiti in prayer during the Haiti Remembrance Ceremony on January 12, 2011.

Reverend Benjamin Casimir of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish in Immokalee and Roman Catholic Bishop Frank J. Dewane of the Diocese of Venice, lead Hope for Haiti in prayer during the Haiti Remembrance Ceremony on January 12, 2011.

JoAnne Kuehner, Founder and President, and her granddaughter, Tiffany Kuehner, Vice President, pray for all who have been affected by the January 12, 2010 earthquake, during a Hope for Haiti remembrance ceremony.
JoAnne Kuehner, Founder and President, and her granddaughter, Tiffany Kuehner, Vice President, pray for all who have been affected by the January 12, 2010 earthquake, during a Hope for Haiti remembrance ceremony.

Hope for Haiti hosts a Haiti Remembrance gathering at office on January 12, 2011.

Hope for Haiti hosts a Haiti Remembrance gathering at office on January 12, 2011.

Beginning at 4:30PM, prayers were given by the Bishop Frank J. Dewane, the Roman Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Venice, Reverend Panel Marc Guerrier of Holy Name of Jesus Episcopal Church in Naples and Reverend Benjamin Casimir of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish in Immokalee. The service included a moment of silence at 4:53pm, the exact time of the earthquake, to reflect and offer prayers for all who died in the earthquake and through Haiti’s current struggle with cholera.

Members of the community and Hope for Haiti staff and volunteers filled the organization’s office, comforting one another by being together during this time of commemoration. Not only was this a time to reflect on the tremendous loss, pain, and sadness over this past year, but it was also a time to remember the enormous generosity, dedication, hard work, camaraderie, and love that was shown in Haiti and worldwide as we all responded to the needs of earthquake survivors.

Since the devastating earthquake on January 12, 2010, Hope for Haiti has been at the forefront of the emergency response and is committed to the country’s recovery. The organization has distributed over $30 million in humanitarian relief and has offered more than 14,000 volunteer hours since the earthquake alone. Hope for Haiti continues to address the country’s most immediate needs in education, nutrition, and healthcare.

Please consider making a gift in memory of all who perished in the quake and in honor of those fighting to survive by donating on Hope for Haiti’s website www.hopeforhaiti.com or contacting their Naples office 239-434-7183.

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