Hope for haiti staff make the long trek back down the mountain 

Providing relief to mountain villages: Hope for Haiti conducts joint Education and Public Health site visit to Cornette Primary School

 

Hope for Haiti staff make the long trek back down the mountain
Hope for Haiti staff make the long trek back down the mountain

Paula Prince, Program Manager, October 28th 2011

In Haiti there are hundreds of small villages tucked away in the mountains, far removed from the hustle and bustle of city life. Because the small paths that lead to the villages are exceptionally rocky and steep, many of the villages are only accessible by foot or on the back of a donkey or mule. Hope for Haiti actively partners with schools in these ultra-rural communities, to ensure that the needs of Haiti’s rural poor are addressed.

On Thursday, October 27th Hope for Haiti staff conducted a joint Education and Public Health site visit to the mountain village of Cornette. After completing the extremely challenging 1.5 hour hike in the mountains around Saint Louis du Sud, Hope for Haiti staff distributed Vitamin A, Albendazole and Multivitamins to the children at Cornette Primary School, while educating the school’s 43 students on the importance of personal hygiene.

Program Manager, Paula Prince, trains Bertin Misson, Director of Cornette Primary School, on how to properly use the Sawyer water filter
Program Manager, Paula Prince, trains Bertin Misson, Director of Cornette Primary School, on how to properly use the Sawyer water filter

The distribution of Vitamin A to Cornette’s preschool students was made possible by Hope for Haiti’s partnership with Vitamin Angels, an organization that aims to reduce child mortality worldwide by providing malnourished children with essential nutrients. Both the Vitamin A and Albedazole, a medication provided by the Worm Project that helps eradicate intestinal parasites, are crucial for children in rural villages such as Cornette. The children’s swollen bellies attest to the fact that many of them suffer from nutrient deficiencies and parasites.

During this particular visit, Hope for Haiti also partnered with Catholic Relief Services and Minustah (the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti) to provide Cornette Primary School with a Sawyer water filter. The Sawyer filter’s advanced filtration technology will ensure that the school has a steady supply of potable water.

In addition to the aforementioned health and water distributions, Hope for Haiti provides vital teacher salary subsidies to the school’s six educators and support for school materials and supplies through our “Back to School Fund”. Hope for Haiti’s Public Health Program ensures that students at Cornette Primary School receive essential information on themes such as disease prevention and hygiene.

The needs of rural mountain villages such as Cornette are immense. The location and lack of transportation access mean that villagers must walk for nearly 2 hours down a rocky mountainside, rain or shine, to receive any sort of medical attention. Thanks to those who believe and support our mission, Hope for Haiti is able to work in partnership with Cornette Primary School to ensure that some of the community’s many needs for education and public health are addressed.

View from car window on way to respond 

Hope for Haiti’s Emergency Response to Flooding Saves Lives

Jennifer Lang, Program Manager, October 28th 2011

It was 8pm when Father Max, Hope for Haiti’s long-term partner and regional education contact, called. “Torbeck is flooding,” he said. “Please help. The water has started coming into the neighborhood’s houses.”

The next morning, before the rain had even stopped, Hope for Haiti staff responded to the emergency with 80 Survival Buckets for the community. The buckets were designed following the 2008 deadly hurricane season and can help keep a family of five alive for one week.

View from car window on way to respond Flooding outside the Hope for Haiti office in Les Cayes Flooded roadway on the way to Torbeck
View from car window on way to respond Flooding outside the Hope for Haiti
office in Les Cayes
Flooded roadway on the way to Torbeck

Two days later, Sister Flora of the L’Oeuvre Saint Francaise orphanage on Ile a Vache called panicked. The government food program which supports the facility’s 73 orphans failed to arrive that month due to the heavy rains. Though Hope for Haiti does not support a formal food program, through the supply provided by Kids Against Hunger of Southwest Florida we sent 500 meals the next morning – capable of feeding the orphans even with no other resources for the next 11 days. The team also sent cholera educational cards supplied by our partner the International Organization for Migration as well as IV fluids. The Hope for Haiti water system had been serviced the previous week, and the Orphanage had previously benefitted from a gift of 3 chlorine buckets to help maintain sanitation. Sister Flora’s staff was able to use the supplies to feed and wash the handicapped children despite the heavy flooding that occurred on the island – 25 minutes by boat from any other healthcare options.

Back at the Hope for Haiti – Les Cayes office, it rained for four days straight. There was a dramatic resurgence in cholera, especially in rural areas where roads to healthcare were inaccessible due to flooding. Our team was personally touched by the cholera epidemic this past week. Long-time friend of the Education Program – handicapped 14-year old student Paulin Marius– brought his blind father to the nearest hospital by walking. Unable to pay the hospital bill, Hope for Haiti staff intervened on behalf of the family of 9 by transporting him to the Cholera Treatment Center within the city.

Hope for Haiti staff Jennifer explaining the use of the chlorine bucket to Paulin A handicapped child drinks clean water at Ile a Vache Orphanage
Hope for Haiti staff Jennifer explaining
the use of the chlorine bucket to Paulin
A handicapped child drinks clean
water at Ile a Vache Orphanage

The Center was harrowing; resources are stretched to the limit. There are more beds than patients, so sick persons and their caretakers squeeze together on school-benches. While Gerard remains in the Center recovering, Hope for Haiti provided Paulin’s household with a chlorine bucket to disinfect drinking water and clean bedding to thereby halt the spread of the disease.

Now that the rain has stopped, more calls have started. Hope for Haiti provided tarps to schools in the rural communities of Ravine Sable and Cotes de Fer to use as temporary walls. Young Paulin will be given water bottles to transport potable drinking water from the Hope for Haiti system installed at his school, College Saint Laurent, to his brothers and sisters at home. We continue to pray for his father and we thank you for your continued support of Hope for Haiti’s Emergency Relief Program to respond to crises.

Teglantina zingg, bibi nunez, october 26th 2011 

Thank You Note

 

Eglantina Zingg, Bibi Nunez, October 26th 2011

tEglantina Zingg, Bibi Nunez, October 26th 2011

Tiffany R. Keuhner
President and CEO
Hope for Haiti

Peace is more than just the absence of violence. It means realizing that if we work together our lives could be different.

Thanks to your generous collaboration and your willingness to participate in this project we were able to host “A Goal for Les Cayes”, a day of soccer and peace for the children in southern Haiti. On Saturday October 22nd we delivered soccer uniforms and sports equipment to 230 students from schools of Cavaillon. We hosted a friendly game between Haiti’s renowned youth team Shana and the local U15 team from Les Cayes. Later in the day, the United Nations Mission’s soccer team and the Presidential team played for peace and understanding.

“A Goal for Les Cayes” was an inspiring and successful experience for all of us. It would have not been possible without the help of everyone at Hope for Haiti, from the very inception of the project. It is through partnerships like this that great work for peace can get accomplished. As we gear up to continue fostering sports and soccer education in southern Haiti we hope that this experience becomes the starting point of a rewarding and continuous collaboration. From everyone at PPLA we would like to express a heartfelt thank you and extend our gratitude to all your staff.

At Project Peace Latin America we believe that fostering human values will help our children and youth develop noble personalities. We are confident that by supporting sports education we will help instill hard work, discipline and teamwork in children, with the hopes that it will in turn enable them to do great things not only for their teams but for their countries as well.

Your participation was instrumental in making this project a success, thank you for joining us and making it happen.

Sincerely,
Eglantina Zingg
Bibi Nunez